Pages

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Exploring Poetry and a Poetry Tea for the Parents

The kids have been exploring poetry in Writer's Workshop. We explored all kinds of poetry, but their favorite poems came from poetry treasuries written by my past Kindergarten classes! They wanted to create a treasury that the next kindergarten classes could enjoy!

Here are some poetry books the kids enjoyed listening too.

Here are some past Kindergarten Class Poetry Books
The first thing they learned was that you can write a poem about ANYTHING! Even a broken pencil!  We read a poem about the ceiling and a pencil sharpener to prove this point.  We practiced whole group by creating a list poem about the sun (which we were exploring at the time).  The kids used descriptive words and phrases that described the sun.  As they dictated, I thought out loud as I wrote about how I had noticed that poems looked different.  They had white space all around them and pointed out that I wanted this poem to LOOK like a poem. 

I placed random objects on their tables such as sticks, shells, rocks, glue, scissors, pencils, etc. and had them explore them, then write a poem about one of them.  They loved this! Many wrote 3 or 4 poems about the different objects on their tables.




We talked about list poems, similes, free verse, how to end a poem, and using their feelings in poems.  One of my students became very angry when some kids told her that dragons were not real.  In her anger, she decided to write a poem about it.  Here are a few examples of poems that the kids wrote


Dragon! No one believes me!  Dragons are real!  I am mad!  No one believes in me!
The sky is like the ocean...very big.
Mrs. Myers Coffee.  It is hot.  She doesn't like cold coffee.  It is smooth, black on the top.  Coffee brown.
The Tambourine.  It makes noise.  I am tired of shaking!
The kids took their poems and made a cover using scrapbook paper to create their own personal treasury of poems. Before we stapled them together, they all picked their favorite poem to give to me for our class treasury.  We also decided it would be fun to read these poems to their parents, so we started planning a Poetry Tea.  

They were very excited about a Poetry Tea and started planning right away!  We made a list.  They wanted to make both tea, and lemon cupcakes for their parents. We had been growing peppermint and lemon balm to use for making tea for ourselves.  Now they wanted to use it to make tea for their parents! 

They started by decorating invitations for thier parents inviting them to our Poetry Tea. Next, they painted paper for letters and created a beautiful sign.


The kids picked leaves from our lemon balm and peppermint plants and layed them out to dry.  They loved the smell of these herbs!


They all took turns with the mortar and pestle crushing and smelling the leaves.



We made a graph to find out which herb they liked the smell of.  They liked both, but since I forced them to choose, most said they liked the peppermint the best.


We then wrote directions on how to make sun tea.  As the kids took turns reading each step, we made our herbal teas!




One of my little explorers wanted to document what was happening to our sun tea.
Next they made the lemon cupcakes.



After we spent a couple days practicing reading our poems from the podium with a microphone, the day for our Poetry Tea arrived! After setting everything up for the parents and practicing some more, we were ready!






I wasn't sure what to expect, but I was thrilled by the amount of parents that came! We had 90% of the parents show up! I was choked up because I knew how hard the kids had worked to put this tea together, how proud they were of their poems, and how excited they were to share them! We started out by letting the kids read their poetry treasuries to their parents at their tables.


When they finished, the kids came up front and sat in our meeting area.  We projected each poem on the Promethium Board as each child came up and read their poem for the parents.  They all did it, even though a few told me when it was all over that they were nervous, but did it anyway! I was so proud of them!


After the readings, we all enjoyed the tea and treats.


It was a very successful Poetry Tea!  The kids were very proud of what they had accomplished.  What amazed me was that something I normally would have done all by myself, the kids were able to do.  This Poetry Tea ended up being an unexpected and very fun project!





4 comments:

  1. What a wonderful documentary of Poetry Tea. I really enjoyed reading it and thinking how I might be able to adapt your ideas with the class am I due to have next year.
    Giving the chidlren a real audience is definitely one if the many reasons this was such a success.

    Thank you for sharing.

    Lisa Warner
    Y4 Teacher, Leeds, UK
    Www.year4blogspot.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much Lisa! I am so glad that our Poetry Tea inspired you! This was the first time I had done a Poetry Tea and I was a little worried about how it would turn out! It ended up being so much fun and it was so meaningful to both the kids and the parents! I will definitely do it again next year. I wonder what next years kids will want to make for the tea?

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is really inspiring stuff! I'm definitely going to use loads of your ideas. I especially love how completely involved the children are with every step of their learning. You say you're inspired by the Reggio Emilio approach - I wondered if you had heard of Building Learning Power, since you obviously encourage the children to plan their own learning, collaborate and persevere. If not, I would definitely recommend that you look it up! Have a great Summer.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you so much Becky! I have not heard of Building Learning Power! I will definitely be looking that up! Thank you very much for the info!!!
    Sincerely,
    Darla

    ReplyDelete